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Extensive TV coverage at Donington Park as 78 cameras catch the action

Extensive TV coverage at Donington Park as 78 cameras catch the action

Extensive TV coverage at Donington Park as 78 cameras catch the action

The thrills and spills of the Cinzano British Grand Prix received extensive television coverage at Donington Park last weekend, with no fewer than 78 cameras beaming the action live to viewers across the world. The coverage was a major step forward in terms of both quality and quantity, with every possible angle of Sunday´s race covered by the latest hi-tech equipment.

As well as three cameras mounted on cranes which extended as high as 45 metres above the ground, one of them including a remote controlled gyrocam rotary system, a section of the circuit was covered by a 15 metre track-side travelling unit which was installed on a moving rail and was operated by three technicians.

In total, the 4,023 kilometre Donington racetrack was covered by 19 track-side cameras, plus 4 digital radio-frequency cameras on pit-lane and a remote-controlled camera in the paddock (paddock-cam).

On top of that, Dorna Sports provided unique footage from 53 on-board cameras positioned on the motorcycles which offered revolutionary close-up perspectives of MotoGP, including Valentino Rossi´s clutch hand, Sete Gibernau on the throttle, Carlos Checa´s rear footbrake, Max Biaggi´s body position from the rear angle of his bike and the view from under the fairing with Colin Edwards and Neil Hodgson, plus the more common front and rear subjective views.

All these cameras featured specifically designed technology developed by Dorna engineers, with the lens and the CCD encapsulated in a miniature aluminium cylinder which measure just 7mm in diameter, 3.6cm in length and weighs just 38g.

Facts & figures:

· 19 track-side cameras
· 4 digital radio-frequency pit-lane cameras
· 1 remote-control paddock-cam
· 3 high-cranes
· 1 travelling unit
· 1 gyrocam
· 53 on-board cameras

Tags:
MotoGP, 2004

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