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Bridgestone satisfied with season so far

Bridgestone satisfied with season so far

Hiroshi Yamada, Bridgestones Motorcycle Sport Department Manager, is enjoying the MotoGP summer break with a sense of satisfaction at the results achieved in the eleven rounds of the World Championship which have already taken place.

Hiroshi Yamada, Bridgestones Motorcycle Sport Department Manager, is enjoying the MotoGP summer break with a sense of satisfaction at the results achieved in the eleven rounds of the World Championship which have already taken place.

The Japanese manufacturers have had the upper hand over rivals Michelin in the so called tyre war, adapting well to the demands of 2007s new regulations to take seven race victories in the first part of the season.

The last race before the brief summer pause in championship proceedings concluded with a dominant win by Bridgestone-shod Ducati rider Casey Stoner at the Red Bull U.S. Grand Prix, to give the Aussie sensation a 44 point general standings lead over nearest rival Valentino Rossi, who rides on Michelin compounds.

It is fair to say that the Bridgestone-Ducati-Stoner combination has been the revelation of the season so far, and the Laguna Seca weekend was another demonstration of the current strength of that triumvirate.

Indeed Bridgestone-equipped riders locked out the top three positions in California with Rizla Suzukis Chris Vermeulen taking second position, his third podium of the season, and Honda Gresinis Marco Melandri scoring an heroic third place - to cement top five positions in the championship for both riders, level pegging on 113 points.

With Bridgestone currently in their strongest position since embarking on their MotoGP premier class adventure in 2002, the Japanese firms Motorcycle Sport Department Manager, Yamada, notes the increasingly important role that tyres and the new restrictions have on Grand Prix weekends.

He commented: Tyres have always played a vital role in motorcycle racing as it is the sole component which directly transfers the bikes energy through to the track surface. The so called tyre war is a welcome situation for us as we are able to showcase our technical abilities in a competitive environment against other tyre manufacturers. The new tyre restrictions were developed based on joint discussions with all three tyre manufacturers involved in MotoGP.

After eleven races, we are still supportive of the regulations and I think they have promoted a more even playing field and a greater competition among the tyre manufacturers and teams. From Bridgestones point of view, the new restrictions add an extra dimension to our approach which is as interesting for the fans and spectators as it is challenging for tyre manufacturers, teams and riders.

Tags:
MotoGP, 2007

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