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Eight races left in MotoGP™: Casey Stoner in the record books

With Repsol Honda Team’s Casey Stoner announcing his retirement at the end of 2012 earlier this season, motogp.com takes a look at the records the current world champion holds as he joins a small list of riders that left the sport at a young age.

He has already amassed a big list of achievements in his relatively short career, as outlined below. With eight races left in his professional career, and a possible eight victories to take, he may not be able to break any more outright records, but can propel himself up the rankings quite significantly. After Laguna Seca, Stoner now has a total of 44 victories in Grand Prix racing, of which 37 have been in the premier class. If he was to take eight victories before the end of the season he could equal Phil Read with 52 and be sixth in the all-time GP victories ranking. This statistic could read even better in terms of premier-class standings as he could sit fourth with 45 behind Mick Doohan, who recorded a total of 54. Below is a list of what the young Australian has already achieved:

Stoner’s records that can’t be broken:

2007/Catalunya/Barcelona: With a win in Catalunya, Stoner becomes the first rider to win four times in one season on a Ducati.

2007/USA/Laguna Seca: Wins from pole and tops all four practice sessions to become the first non-American rider to win at Laguna Seca in the MotoGP era.

2007/Japan/Motegi: Stoner becomes the first rider to win the MotoGP title on a Ducati.

2008/Qatar/Losail: Wins the first ever MotoGP race to take place at night under floodlights.

2009/Italy/Mugello: Gives Ducati their first ever premier-class win at the Italian Grand Prix.

2010/Spain/Aragón: Wins the first MotoGP race to be held at the new Aragón circuit.

2011/USA/Laguna Seca: Wins for the 5th time in 2011 – the highest number of wins by a Honda rider during the 800cc era of MotoGP. He went on to record 10 victories in total that season.

Stoner’s records that can be broken:

2006/Turkey/Istanbul: Finishes on the podium in his third MotoGP start to become the youngest Australian rider to finish on the podium in the premier-class.

2007/Qatar/Losail: Wins in his first race for Ducati to become the youngest Australian to win in the premier-class and also the first Australian rider to win in 125cc, 250cc and premier-class.

2008/San Marino/Misano: Qualifies on pole for the seventh successive race – the longest sequence of successive poles in the MotoGP era to date.

2011/Japan/Motegi: Starts on pole for the tenth time in 2011 – a new record for most pole positions in a season during the MotoGP era.

Stoner’s near-record performances:

2006/Qatar/Losail: Qualifies on pole in just his second start in MotoGP to become the second youngest rider of all-time to start from pole in the premier-class; the only rider to start from pole at a younger age is Freddie Spencer.

2007/San Marino/Misano: Wins three successive races for the first time and is the first to do so on a European manufactured bike [Ducati] since Giacomo Agostini in 1972.

Others riders that retired young:

Stoner, who will be 27 years old when he leaves MotoGP after the Valencia round in November, may be considered one of the youngest successful riders to retire. This is certainly true for the modern-day era, however there were some other prominent names that had similar ideas a long time ago.

Gary Hocking: Won the 500cc & 350cc titles in 1961 and then retired after the Isle of Man TT in 1962 after his good friend Tom Phillis was killed. Hocking was just 24 when he retired.

John Surtees: He had seven world titles to his name when he retired at the end of 1960 (4 x 500cc + 3 x 350cc). He was just 26 when he retired. He went on to become the first person to win both the 500cc world title and the F1 car racing title.

Mike Hailwood: Had nine titles to his name when he retired at the end of 1967, including 4 x 500cc titles. He was 27 when he retired.

Tags:
MotoGP, 2012, Casey Stoner

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