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Kenny Roberts reveals his alternative fitness techniques as a difficult season drags onwards

Kenny Roberts reveals his alternative fitness techniques as a difficult season drags onwards

Kenny Roberts reveals his alternative fitness techniques as a difficult season drags onwards

It would not be unfair to say that Kenny Roberts is not enjoying the most productive phase of his career. The 2000 500cc World Champion is languishing at the wrong end of the standings with only a best result of 13th to show for his efforts in ten races.

The American couldn´t have endured a tougher season. The Suzuki four-stroke project still shows no sign of being able to challenge the might of Honda, Ducati and even Yamaha, relegating the 30 year old and team-mate John Hopkins to virtual bystanders. Roberts has also missed several races through injury thanks to a nasty crash in Italy.

Here the Californian, who bases himself in Barcelona, comments on his recovery from the Mugello fall (damage to the shoulder and chest) and also how he is using slightly different training methods to boost his fitness.

´The initial shock and pain of the injury started subsiding three or four weeks after Mugello. I had shoulder contusions on both shoulders and the chest. They were multiple injuries from a compression crash that prohibited me from doing anything with my upper body. Sneezing, coughing and things like that was just excruciating for the first 14 to 21 days.

Suzuki and Garry Taylor didn't want me riding in our current situation unless I was 100% fit. Just before Donington the pain and the swelling and bruising and stuff was better, but I had no strength and stamina. So Suzuki said it was best to wait for Sachsenring, until I was back to normal.

I prepare differently from any other rider; my training is more aggressive. At this stage of my career and regarding my personal mentality and competitiveness, I simply have to compete. If I was just on a bicycle or went out to run by myself there's no way I would have enough endurance.

So I have trainers that I pay to play basketball or racketball/squash with me and we go full-out for an hour and a half each day. The competitive element motivates me to get the ball. It's different than having to push yourself because you're not thinking about the training, just the game. Since 1999 this has really helped with my motivation."

Tags:
MotoGP, 2003, Kurtis Roberts

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